Nipple and breast in profile - soy bean and breast cancer

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soy bean and breast cancer - Nipple and breast in profile


Apr 08,  · Answer From Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. Studies show that a lifelong diet rich in soy foods reduces the risk of breast cancer in women. This protective effect is less dramatic for women who eat less soy or who start eating soy later in life. Soy contains protein, isoflavones and fiber, all of which provide health benefits. Summary: The current consensus among health experts who study soy is that breast cancer survivors can safely eat these foods. Emerging research suggests that soy foods may decrease the likelihood of breast cancer recurrence in women with a history of the disease.

Conclusions: The naturally occurring dietary intake of soy food or its components appears safe for women without breast cancer; however, the safety of high supplements of soy or its components is less certain. Implications for nursing: Nurses should become more knowledgeable about soy foods and supplements and include soy intake in dietary vulvaxxx.xyz by: Because estrogen can promote the development, growth, and spread of breast cancers, doctors have worried that eating a lot of soy foods or soy isoflavones (which can be taken as a dietary supplement) might worsen the prognosis of women diagnosed with breast cancer.

Apr 29,  · In fact, there is growing evidence that eating traditional soy foods such as tofu, tempeh, edamame, miso, and soymilk may lower the risk of breast cancer, especially among Asian women. Soy foods are excellent sources of protein, especially when they replace other, less healthy foods such as animal fats and red or processed vulvaxxx.xyz: Stacy Simon. Breast cancer. Eating a high-soy diet is linked to a slightly reduced risk of developing breast cancer in some but not all women. Asian women who eat a high-soy diet seem to have a lower risk of breast cancer than those who eat less soy. But most research shows no benefit in Western-culture women.